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ElantraClub - For Elantra Owners and Enthusiasts _ Elantra AD/MD/UD General _ MD 40 MPG Road Trip How to

Posted by: IHeartMyRedCar Apr 21 2012, 04:16 PM

Ladies and Gentleman,

I took my 2012 Hyundai Elantra Limited with the Tech package on a road trip. My first road trip was when the car only had 200 miles on it. I wasn't expecting much because of the low mileage on the car. I averaged 33 mpg on that trip (PA to Vermont 400+ miles).

However I just took a trip from Burlington, VT to Albany, NY this past week. And boy was I impressed. I decided on my way back to Burlington from Albany I would take pictures of mileage alone the way and explain the speeds I was traveling and terrain. My MD had about 2200 miles when this trip was started.

This trip was done without and I repeat without the ECO mode on. I decided to reset my average MPG on the dash when I left Albany because while I was in Albany I was driving around in the city and such so it originally decreased my beginning trip average MPG to 34 MPG.

This picture was taken at the start of the trip. I originally said to myself, "I just reset it, it's not going to stay there." Blah, blah, blah. However I decided to play with traveling at different speeds.
Here is my breakdown:
64 mph or under will get you 40 mpg at least on the highway (flat surface)
65-70 mph will get you about 37-38 mpg
80+ mph will get you about 33 mpg

This breakdown was determined without much use of cruise control and here's why. I will only use cruise control on a flat surface. (Tip 1) I will turn it off when a down hill or uphill is coming, even if it is slight uphill. I use the downhill to my advantage. If you leave the cruise control turned on, it will use less gas however it doesn't let you gain speed. It will try and hold the car back to keep it at that speed. Therefore, you aren't using gravity to your advantage. (Tip 2: Turn the cruise control off on downhills.)

Now let's talk about uphills and cruise control. We all know any kind of incline kills the gas mileage in the MDs. There are plenty of inclines in upstate NY and VT and I still got 40 MPG! Tip 3: Turn the cruise control off about 0.5 miles before any incline on the highway. If you leave the cruise control on during an incline, the car doesn't know how long the incline will last or how steep it is so it will shoot the RPMs way up (3200+) to maintain the cruising speed even if it's a slight incline. This equals a gas mileage killer. So to fix this, the driver knows how steep the incline is and how long it will last therefore the driver can control the RPM's and speed. Every time I encountered an incline, I would increase my speed only about 5 mph prior to the incline. This barely increases the RPMs and you make it up the incline. So what if you loose a couple MPH while going up the incline, you are still maintaining the best MPG possible. It is important to watch your RPMs here because you only want them to slightly increase, you do not want to JUMP UP to 3000+ rpms on an incline.

Now you make think this is common sense or I am full of crap. However I felt I should share my 40 MPG story since most MD owners are saying it is un-achievable.

Below are more random pictures of mileage while I was driving.








Final MPG was 39.1 MPG according to the car. I still have yet to fill up and do the correct calculation because I still have 50 miles at least in the tank.The last 15 miles were full of stop lights every few 100 feet. After every stop light (complete stop), I accelerated slowly. I didn't put the pedal to the floor or anything like that.

Main points from this post:

1) 40 MPG is reachable without the ECO mode
2) Only use cruise control on a true flat surface
3) Turn off cruise control on downhills
4) Turn off cruise control on any inclines.

Thoughts, comments and feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Posted by: benman Apr 21 2012, 05:35 PM

This is a great writeup. My daily commute is all hills (which, along with bridges, are inescapable in Pittsburgh) and your experiences line up exactly with mine -- cruise control is no good on hills, down or up. I do the same things you noted, getting up some speed for hills. My commute starts with 3/4 mile steep uphill within a 2 mile stretch of all uphill and downhill. If I reset my calculator at the beginning of my commute, I'm at about 18mpg after the first two miles. Hills and stop-and-goes are killers.

Another thing I've noticed is that when I first changed my commute time to be before rush-hour, my fuel economy did not go down. I believe this is because

a) travel in open road is faster (70+ mph) before rush hour (people are maniacs at 5:30-6:00 am)
b) most of the traffic I encounter during rush hour is on a full 2-mile downhill slope.

The EPA tests are for level ground at no speed over 62mph, so achieving 39.1mpg is great for a trip like this.

Someday I'm going to take a day and do some experiments on level ground (seriously, need to go to Ohio for that). Because of how the final EPA rating is determined, my bet is that fuel economy of 47-48 mpg is easily achievable on level highway at around 60 mph.

The 2011 Elantra has Fisher-Price ECO, so I have no experience with that, except that it should be ignored on hills.

Posted by: roydjt Apr 21 2012, 07:31 PM

I'm amazed that you could get 39+mpg with the parking brake on.

-Roy

Posted by: IHeartMyRedCar Apr 21 2012, 08:35 PM

QUOTE (roydjt @ Apr 21 2012, 08:31 PM) *
I'm amazed that you could get 39+mpg with the parking brake on.

-Roy


haha yeah i always put it on. force of habit

Posted by: Alex2011Sonata Apr 21 2012, 09:10 PM

Wow great write up Amanda. Thanks for taking the time to do this. clap3.gif

Posted by: dirtydave Apr 22 2012, 12:58 AM

great write-up, I'll be interested in the fill-up mileage, I saw the 40 MPG on my first trip from the dealership to home in Iowa City, but when I filled up it was 32 MPG. I would also give that trip a try WITH eco enabled to see if you get the same/better mileage.

Posted by: mbenz Apr 22 2012, 10:45 AM

I just took a trip to east Strasbourg university yesterday. i was getting 30+ mpg. I was speeding and there was some stop and go but i believe that i can get 40+ but great write up smile.gif

Posted by: fsv87 Apr 22 2012, 06:41 PM

This is a great write up. I think it should be stickied so we have a place to point the people that come complaining about their cars not hitting 40 MPG without saying the same things over and over again.

Posted by: winc Apr 22 2012, 10:11 PM

That seems like an awful lot of "work" to attain that magic 40 number. Using the same tactics, I could easily eke out 26-ish mpg out of my 2012 Wrangler Unlimited that's EPA rated at 16/20/18 combined. Currently I'm setting the cruise at 75-78 and getting 21.x with ease and 18-20 with spirited driving in town. The current "real world average" on fueleconomy.gov even shows 18.2.

The 2012 Elantra is rated 29/40/33 with the 6-speed automatic, but the current "real world average" is only showing 29.2.

From http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/how_tested.shtml

QUOTE
Fuel economy is measured under controlled conditions in a laboratory using a standardized test procedure specified by federal law. Manufacturers test their own vehicles—usually pre-production prototypes—and report the results to EPA. EPA reviews the results and confirms about 10-15 percent of them through their own tests at the National Vehicles and Fuel Emissions Laboratory.


Sure, my Jeep isn't a 2012 Elantra, but the ease of achieving mileage ratings on it as well as most other vehicles I've owned makes me think the Elantra was likely not one of the 10-15% of vehicles that the EPA tested but received those figures from Hyundai instead.

I really feel for all of these people that feel deceived, however I think they're directing their blame in the wrong direction. If a dealer is putting big 40 mpg stickers on all of these windshields, leading the customer to expect it, then the dealer is the one doing most of the deceiving... not necessarily Hyundai.

Posted by: IHeartMyRedCar Apr 23 2012, 08:30 AM

The problem with elantra buyers is that they don't realize how small the engine is. Any hill in a car with a 1.8L engine will kill the gas mileage. Elantras are meant for highway driving. I find it silly when people think they are going to get 40 MPG in a city driving an Elantra around. Ford is advertising their new Focus's as "Up to 40 MPG." A better use of words yes, however people will still be pissed at Ford for misleading them. I feel bigger engines handle the city driving much better then the elantra.

Winc, you may think that is a lot work but its not. The are no highways on the Western side of VT straight north due to all the hills and mountains. Achieving an average of 39.1 mpg in a 1.8L car going up and down hills is great. It just proves if you go less than 65 on totally flat highways, the elantra can easily achieve 47-48 mpg.

Posted by: Silentwolf Apr 23 2012, 10:12 AM

Engine size matters along with gearing. Mom's 3800lb Buick Ultra w/SC'd 3.8v6 will get up to 30+mpg on the hwy due to gearing. Elantra seems to be geared similarly, but it lacks the power to do anything but flat land. While the Buick only has to spit out a bit more gas for the oomph to get over that hill, the Elantra has to chug a bit.

And thats def not a lot of work, thats actually good driving, and barely tapping the hypermiling potential. A further step you could do on downhill sections is to pop it into neutral, some take it even farther by turning the car off but not a fan of that. I only turn off at a recently turned red light.

Posted by: IHeartMyRedCar Apr 23 2012, 11:08 AM

QUOTE (Silentwolf @ Apr 23 2012, 11:12 AM) *
And thats def not a lot of work, thats actually good driving, and barely tapping the hypermiling potential. A further step you could do on downhill sections is to pop it into neutral, some take it even farther by turning the car off but not a fan of that. I only turn off at a recently turned red light.


Does anyone have experience or true knowledge about switching back and forth between neutral and drive? I was told frequent switching between neutral and drive is hard on the transmission so I don't do it. Is this true?

Posted by: NevynPA Apr 23 2012, 12:55 PM

QUOTE (IHeartMyRedCar @ Apr 21 2012, 05:16 PM) *
Now let's talk about uphills and cruise control. We all know any kind of incline kills the gas mileage in the MDs. There are plenty of inclines in upstate NY and VT and I still got 40 MPG! Tip 3: Turn the cruise control off about 0.5 miles before any incline on the highway. If you leave the cruise control on during an incline, the car doesn't know how long the incline will last or how steep it is so it will shoot the RPMs way up (3200+) to maintain the cruising speed even if it's a slight incline. This equals a gas mileage killer. So to fix this, the driver knows how steep the incline is and how long it will last therefore the driver can control the RPM's and speed. Every time I encountered an incline, I would increase my speed only about 5 mph prior to the incline. This barely increases the RPMs and you make it up the incline. So what if you loose a couple MPH while going up the incline, you are still maintaining the best MPG possible. It is important to watch your RPMs here because you only want them to slightly increase, you do not want to JUMP UP to 3000+ rpms on an incline.



This is commonly called "Driving With Load" among hypermilers, and is one of the BEST things to learn in order to keep your MPG up. Excellent job!


Posted by: Popkorn Apr 23 2012, 07:12 PM

Thanks for the great write up. I used those tactics with success on a 300 mile trip last weekend.
A little more detail: ECO =off, limited edition with about 7,500 miles on it. Fresh 3rd oil change. Driver/passenger and ~100# of gear, so around a 450lb load.
We traveled a loop from 200' above sea level, over a 4,200' pass, down to ~3,000' high desert floor. 150 miles and the car's meter indicated 36.6mpg.
On the return, we traveled over a 4,800' pass, back down to the Willamette Valley floor. 155 miles and the thingy indicated 39.2mpg. The average speed for the whole trip was 59mph - we hauled azz.
The trick is not only picking up speed before the hill, but using the manual shift to keep the car in 6th or let it lug down and knock it into 5th.
Used cruise most of the time. In the hills but not in the mountains. Tried to keep the rpms under 3k. (Had to pass a few trailers.) Used cruise on the downhills. Why would cruise lose efficiency on downhills?
I'm interested to see if I can dump data back and fourth from the new gps to the Garmin maps app like I do the on the Etrex. More on that later.

Posted by: IHeartMyRedCar Apr 23 2012, 07:26 PM

QUOTE (Popkorn @ Apr 23 2012, 08:12 PM) *
Used cruise on the downhills. Why would cruise lose efficiency on downhills?


I will turn off cruise control when going downhill because then I can use the downhill to my advantage. If you leave the cruise control turned on, it will use less gas however it doesn't let you gain speed. It will try and hold the car back to keep it at that speed. Therefore, you aren't using gravity to your advantage.

Posted by: Silentwolf Apr 23 2012, 08:06 PM

QUOTE (IHeartMyRedCar @ Apr 23 2012, 12:08 PM) *
Does anyone have experience or true knowledge about switching back and forth between neutral and drive? I was told frequent switching between neutral and drive is hard on the transmission so I don't do it. Is this true?


You have an auto, dont you? Not as sure about that with them. I have a manual,so.......

Posted by: fsv87 Apr 23 2012, 08:37 PM

As for switching to neutral, don't do that. You get better mileage keeping it in drive and coasting. The car turns the fuel injectors off and uses the cars momentum to keep the crankshaft spinning when coasting in drive. If the car is in neutral it can't do this, and must use fuel so it doesn't stall.

Posted by: Popkorn Apr 23 2012, 08:50 PM

QUOTE (IHeartMyRedCar @ Apr 23 2012, 05:26 PM) *
If you leave the cruise control turned on, it will use less gas however it doesn't let you gain speed.

Huh??? On a steep hill? I beg to differ. I've driven cars where cruise will actually brake the car if too fast. But not the E car. It was coasting over 75 cruise set at 65.

Posted by: benman Apr 24 2012, 08:42 AM

Popkorn -- it depends on how steep the hill is. My experience is that with lower grade hills, the car will use the engine to brake (not actually apply brakes), but at higher grades, the car will run away. On lower grades, without cruise control, I will lose momentum (65 at top of hill, 58-60 at the bottom).

Posted by: NevynPA Apr 24 2012, 02:44 PM

QUOTE (IHeartMyRedCar @ Apr 23 2012, 08:26 PM) *
I will turn off cruise control when going downhill because then I can use the downhill to my advantage. If you leave the cruise control turned on, it will use less gas however it doesn't let you gain speed. It will try and hold the car back to keep it at that speed. Therefore, you aren't using gravity to your advantage.


Not 100% correct.

QUOTE (fsv87 @ Apr 23 2012, 09:37 PM) *
As for switching to neutral, don't do that. You get better mileage keeping it in drive and coasting. The car turns the fuel injectors off and uses the cars momentum to keep the crankshaft spinning when coasting in drive. If the car is in neutral it can't do this, and must use fuel so it doesn't stall.


Not 100% correct.

QUOTE (Popkorn @ Apr 23 2012, 09:50 PM) *
Huh??? On a steep hill? I beg to differ. I've driven cars where cruise will actually brake the car if too fast. But not the E car. It was coasting over 75 cruise set at 65.


It can happen, depending on the steepness of the decline.

Here are the two situations:

1). Neutral downhill - essentially freewheeling. Engine is idling, so it is using gas at same rate as idle. Car will gain as much speed as is possible on the descent. If there's an incline or a long run-out (flat area) at the bottom, and the increase in speed from the downhill doesn't put you doing a zillion miles an hour, this is best as you gain the maximum possible momentum.

2). In-gear downhill - engine braking. The engine and drive axles remain connected and in gear. As you begin to pick up speed, the ECU send signal to the fuel injectors to shut off entirely, and engine acts as aux brake to help reduce the speed of the vehicle. Fuel use is ZERO (injectors are off), but momentum gained is highly reduced. Best used when the decline is extremely steep, long, or if speed gained from N-coasting down the hill/mountain will put car going way too fast for speed limit/conditions/etc.


All that to say this: All three of you are right - depending on the situation. If it's a route you are intimately familiar with, you will be able to know if N-coasting or DFCO (deceleration fuel cut off) is the best choice for each downhill along the way. By making use of both options to their fullest potential, you can optimize your driving for the highest possible MPG.

Posted by: benman Apr 24 2012, 04:30 PM

What Jeff (NevynPA) says is my experience as well.

Even in neutral, if the grade is low enough, the car will slow down due to drag if you start the downhill at a high speed, like 65-70.

Like Jeff said, on each hill of a normal commute, you need to figure out what will work best.

Although hypermilers poo-poo it, the problem with coasting in neutral is having an additional step (putting it back into Drive) if you need power to avoid a dangerous situation.

I find that on a steeper hill, leaving it in gear is fine if it's steep enough to overcome the engine braking and drag.

On low-grade hills, neutral works best (unless you want to be going 55mph on an interstate when everyone else is going a minimum of 65).

I have a 2-mile low-grade downhill at the end of my commute. At the point I start it (about 10 miles into my commute), my dash computer (reset at the the beginning) usually reads about 24mpg. By the time I reach the bottom of the hill and coast awhile, I'm up around 30. If I don't coast and keep it in gear, it's more like 28.(see footnote)

The other fortunate thing about this hill is that there's a tunnel about a mile from the bottom and the lead-up to the tunnel is flat. So about the time my car is slowing down, traffic is slowing down as well, so I can let it coast a little longer than usual. If I keep it in gear, I have to power it for more of the flat stretch.

Of course, on the way home I have a 2-mile grade uphill and, unfortunately, traffic speed starts to pick up at the bottom of it as we exit the tunnel, but that's life.

Footnote -- yeah, yeah, I know the "right" way to calculate MPG, but like I've said before, a tankful is going to tell me nothing about my commute since my other driving varies wildly from day to day and is mostly "village" driving. The dashboard computer is good for relative comparison (assuming constant inaccuracy as opposed to random inaccuracy).

Posted by: NevynPA May 4 2012, 09:25 AM

I pinned this topic to the top of the forum so that it doesn't get lost among all the "I'm not getting 40 MPG average in a car that's rated 40 MPG highway and 33 MPG average" complaints.

Posted by: DaveSause May 31 2012, 11:31 AM

Nice writeup ... but what you don't say is that you actually took the trip mileage and divided by the gallons to determine an accurate MPG. You CANNOT trust the MPG guage. Try this, after you have reached cruising speed on a highway on a level surface, with cruise and ECO on - hit the reset on MPG. You may find that when the guage registers it will say something crazy like 99.9 MPG and it will begin to go down. At other times it will hold 50+MPG for quite a while and only gradually will settle to something realistic. Typically my gauge without messing with it reads about 4-5 MPG higher than the actual I calculate using gallons and miles.

Now here are some other interesting facts. When you first fill up, what does the gauge say for range to empty? In my case it always said 322 and I must also say that I was using 87 octance with the standard "up to 10% ethanol". (2012 Elantra limited, tech package, automatic). I also have a 2011 Kia Optima EX which is the 2.4L GDI engine, fully loaded and it normally says 352. I have found in the Kia if I fill up with 87 no ethanol, 89 no ethanol or 91 no ethanol the guage immediately reads higher, like up to 450 miles. It's amazing to me that it analyzes the octane mix and makes a different calculation. On the Elantra I see smaller changes - it might say 340-360. I'm still experimenting, and trying to see if the increase is real and financially justified.

One other issue has an impact. The owner's manual says that either 10W30 or 5W20 oils are OK, but my dealer said there was a service bulletin indicating that 10W30 could cause engine noise and they were reluctant to put in the Castrol GTX 10W30 I provided (and which I've used for 20+ years in all of our cars). I did some reasearch and found that synthetic oils have better high temperature protection even in lighter weights. I also found that Castrol gives 150,000 or 250,000 or 300,000 mile engine warranties by registering on line and saving receipts showing that you used the indicated oil. So now instead of $6 per quart GTX 10W30, I use $10 per quart Edge Titanium 5W20 to get the maximum warranty. Again, the impact was more noticeable in the bigger engine - it seemed to run quieter and had more pep. On the Elantra, it's more subtle. It used to be that lifting off the accelerator immediately produced a drop in speed, now it seems to coast and lose speed more slowly. I believe I am getting better mileage, but I am not sure yet. Oddly the Kia gets within a mile or two per gallon that the Elantra does. Best mileage so far on Elantra, 35.59 MPG all highway, 10W30 oil, 87 no ethanol. Best on the Kia, 32.68,
all highway, 90% highway, 10W30 oil, 87 no ethanol. I conclude that the larger engine doesn't strain, even with the bigger car.

Dave

Posted by: rexerex Jul 13 2012, 10:23 AM

QUOTE (DaveSause @ May 31 2012, 10:31 AM) *
Nice writeup ... but what you don't say is that you actually took the trip mileage and divided by the gallons to determine an accurate MPG. You CANNOT trust the MPG guage. ..... Typically my gauge without messing with it reads about 4-5 MPG higher than the actual I calculate using gallons and miles.

Mine too! What about the thought that the MPG program is calibrated for non-ethanol gas and using ~10% ethanol gas might account for the error? Unfortunately I can't find a non-ethanol gas pump anywhere near where I normally drive.

Now here are some other interesting facts. ... I have found in the Kia if I fill up with 87 no ethanol, 89 no ethanol or 91 no ethanol the guage immediately reads higher, like up to 450 miles. It's amazing to me that it analyzes the octane mix and makes a different calculation. ...

I'd be amazed if that's what it's really doing. huh.gif

...

Dave



Posted by: Kate31 Jul 13 2012, 10:52 AM

When I check mine in comparison to the actual MPG is get less than a 1.0 mpg so I would say at least for my car, I can trust it!

I still love this write up Amanda...was tempted to do one for my big 3,000 miles but still have yet to do so.

Posted by: rexerex Jul 13 2012, 10:59 AM

QUOTE (IHeartMyRedCar @ Apr 23 2012, 10:08 AM) *
Does anyone have experience or true knowledge about switching back and forth between neutral and drive? I was told frequent switching between neutral and drive is hard on the transmission so I don't do it. Is this true?


It appears to be debatable. Deceleration with the transmission engaged will shut off modern electronic fuel injectors as opposed to them using fuel at idle rate in neutral, so no fuel savings if coasting in neutral. Transmission wear may be increased by doing it, but there's lots of debate about that. Plus it could even be illegal according to some people. The reasoning is if the engine stalls you will lose power steering and brakes which could be dangerous.
Very little fuel savings if any for most drivers so leave it in gear until you learn different.

Posted by: omar Nov 2 2012, 04:02 PM



I moved from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati OH where I do not have as many hills as they were in Pittsburgh. I have tried everything to get good gas milage but I can't. I have tried to accelerate before going UPhill, get momentum & then leave car in nuetral and engage back again once I am up the hill but the gain in gas milage is not worth the effort doing it every time. Putting in Neutral both uphill and downhill improves gas milage a lot but it is a lot of effort to do.

Here is what happens.

If I fill a gast tank on the side of interstate and go staright to interstate drive b/w 55-60 MPH at RPM <2000 I will get 39 - 40 MPG. After driving 30 miles on interstate, as soon as I leave interstate and drive 1mile ONLY again ONE MILE ONLY in the city - MPG drops to 29 MPG.

By doing using nuterals uphill or downhill I gain an advantage of 3-5 MPG so Interstate becomes 43-44 MPG and adding 1 mile of city driving will make it 32-33 MPG.

I have stopped putting car in neutral as gaining 3-4 MPG is not worth the effort as I had bought Elantra with Advertisement of "40MPG" I thought going 1 mile on inside roat may drop it to 36-37 MPG & not 29 MPG. Also putting car in neutral while going downhill makes it a free rolling ball as otherwise Engine RPM would slow the car decreases chance of accidents. (I work in Trauma Center so I know what car accidents can do - gaining 3-4 MPG is not worth the risk)

As far as Manual is concerned - I cannot upshift the car until car computer allows me to do it. It is not exactly same as driving "Stick Shift" but I will try Manual and see, if I can get any advantage on MPG.

Posted by: Red Elantra Nov 2 2012, 04:18 PM

Hey-it's always best to drive the car, starting with a full tank, and fill it when needed, and then do the math to figure out the mpg. I would never rely on a "mpg meter" to know the true mpgs.

Posted by: Alex2013GT Nov 2 2012, 08:33 PM

QUOTE (omar @ Nov 2 2012, 05:02 PM) *
I moved from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati OH where I do not have as many hills as they were in Pittsburgh. I have tried everything to get good gas milage but I can't. I have tried to accelerate before going UPhill, get momentum & then leave car in nuetral and engage back again once I am up the hill but the gain in gas milage is not worth the effort doing it every time. Putting in Neutral both uphill and downhill improves gas milage a lot but it is a lot of effort to do.

Here is what happens.

If I fill a gast tank on the side of interstate and go staright to interstate drive b/w 55-60 MPH at RPM <2000 I will get 39 - 40 MPG. After driving 30 miles on interstate, as soon as I leave interstate and drive 1mile ONLY again ONE MILE ONLY in the city - MPG drops to 29 MPG.

By doing using nuterals uphill or downhill I gain an advantage of 3-5 MPG so Interstate becomes 43-44 MPG and adding 1 mile of city driving will make it 32-33 MPG.

I have stopped putting car in neutral as gaining 3-4 MPG is not worth the effort as I had bought Elantra with Advertisement of "40MPG" I thought going 1 mile on inside roat may drop it to 36-37 MPG & not 29 MPG. Also putting car in neutral while going downhill makes it a free rolling ball as otherwise Engine RPM would slow the car decreases chance of accidents. (I work in Trauma Center so I know what car accidents can do - gaining 3-4 MPG is not worth the risk)

As far as Manual is concerned - I cannot upshift the car until car computer allows me to do it. It is not exactly same as driving "Stick Shift" but I will try Manual and see, if I can get any advantage on MPG.

Didn't you buy a flood damaged car? It seems EXTREMELY strange that the computer would drop from 39-40 MPG after 30 miles of driving down to 29 MPG after only one mile, that is unless that one mile takes 30 minutes to drive. If that is happening it sounds like there might be some sort of an issue with the car? Do your hand calculations reveal the same drop?

Posted by: Silentwolf Nov 3 2012, 12:07 AM

QUOTE (omar @ Nov 2 2012, 05:02 PM) *
I moved from Pittsburgh to Cincinnati OH where I do not have as many hills as they were in Pittsburgh. I have tried everything to get good gas milage but I can't. I have tried to accelerate before going UPhill, get momentum & then leave car in nuetral and engage back again once I am up the hill but the gain in gas milage is not worth the effort doing it every time. Putting in Neutral both uphill and downhill improves gas milage a lot but it is a lot of effort to do.

Here is what happens.

If I fill a gast tank on the side of interstate and go staright to interstate drive b/w 55-60 MPH at RPM <2000 I will get 39 - 40 MPG. After driving 30 miles on interstate, as soon as I leave interstate and drive 1mile ONLY again ONE MILE ONLY in the city - MPG drops to 29 MPG.

By doing using nuterals uphill or downhill I gain an advantage of 3-5 MPG so Interstate becomes 43-44 MPG and adding 1 mile of city driving will make it 32-33 MPG.

I have stopped putting car in neutral as gaining 3-4 MPG is not worth the effort as I had bought Elantra with Advertisement of "40MPG" I thought going 1 mile on inside roat may drop it to 36-37 MPG & not 29 MPG. Also putting car in neutral while going downhill makes it a free rolling ball as otherwise Engine RPM would slow the car decreases chance of accidents. (I work in Trauma Center so I know what car accidents can do - gaining 3-4 MPG is not worth the risk)

As far as Manual is concerned - I cannot upshift the car until car computer allows me to do it. It is not exactly same as driving "Stick Shift" but I will try Manual and see, if I can get any advantage on MPG.


I cannot see how putting a car into neutral (even an A/T) requires THAT much effort. Push button in and push it forward one notch......

Secondly, the car is NOT a free rolling ball. Brake modulation on the downhill side works wonders, and some of that momentum gained on the downside of one hill could easily translate into the next hill (if close to first one). The driver prevents any mishaps, NOT the engine or car. What the car will do is prevent serious injury in case there is an accident.

Posted by: IHeartMyRedCar Nov 6 2012, 10:32 AM

To keep the car from auto downshifting on a down hill, put in manual and leave it in 6th. It will stay in 6th gear every time and will not down shift causing you to loose momentum.

Posted by: malawibob Nov 17 2012, 08:55 AM

Great report Amanda. How about this one from the other end of the universe.....Florida. (We don't have hills of any consequence). 2013 Elantra Limited with about 3600 miles on it now. My best mileage was 44.9 at 65mph average. On a 44mph road I can hit over 40mpg every time. At 70mph on interstates I get around 39mpg. Someone tested a bunch of cars and found that the Elantra can only get 40mpg below 74mph, so I tested it and found I can get increasing mileage indications at 77mph. (Didn't keep it there for long so I don't have final figures). I always drive with cruise control on but with eco off. (I said Florida doesn't have any bad hills).

On another note I wonder if anyone else is having an accelerator problem? I had 2011 Hybrid Sonata that was flat out dangerous because it sometimes took over 2 seconds to respond to accelerator pressure. Dealer told me that was normal?!? When asked what he could do for me I told him sell it and immediately took a trade to 2013 Elantra. It also has hesitated responding to accelerator pressure when making a sharp turn. I have to turn from a 90 degree driveway onto a 6 lane highway and believe me you do not want a hesitation in response to pushing, (even gently), on the gas pedal. I believe Hyundai has an engineering problem with the fuel flow that makes their cars dangerous!

Posted by: elantraguy241 Nov 17 2012, 10:40 AM

I find Serenity to be quite peppy with small inputs on the accelerator pedal. Eco modes kills the response, but you said you have it off.

Posted by: henryd1981 Nov 25 2012, 07:19 PM

On my day trip to Oklahoma on Thanksgiving, my overall mileage on the tank, with mostly highway driving, was 33.9 mpg according to my Gas Cubby app. The MPG display on my dash went on a downward trajectory on the way back home. The drive had plenty of hills and my destination had a higher elevation than my starting point. I stayed close to the speed limit, maybe going 3 over at most and used cruise. Also, I had a headwind driving home. Temps were in the low 70s that afternoon.

I have plans to go to Waco in the near future. I plan to check the mileage again since it's flatter terrain than heading to Oklahoma.

Posted by: Silentwolf Nov 25 2012, 09:31 PM

QUOTE (malawibob @ Nov 17 2012, 08:55 AM) *
Great report Amanda. How about this one from the other end of the universe.....Florida. (We don't have hills of any consequence). 2013 Elantra Limited with about 3600 miles on it now. My best mileage was 44.9 at 65mph average. On a 44mph road I can hit over 40mpg every time. At 70mph on interstates I get around 39mpg. Someone tested a bunch of cars and found that the Elantra can only get 40mpg below 74mph, so I tested it and found I can get increasing mileage indications at 77mph. (Didn't keep it there for long so I don't have final figures). I always drive with cruise control on but with eco off. (I said Florida doesn't have any bad hills).

On another note I wonder if anyone else is having an accelerator problem? I had 2011 Hybrid Sonata that was flat out dangerous because it sometimes took over 2 seconds to respond to accelerator pressure. Dealer told me that was normal?!? When asked what he could do for me I told him sell it and immediately took a trade to 2013 Elantra. It also has hesitated responding to accelerator pressure when making a sharp turn. I have to turn from a 90 degree driveway onto a 6 lane highway and believe me you do not want a hesitation in response to pushing, (even gently), on the gas pedal. I believe Hyundai has an engineering problem with the fuel flow that makes their cars dangerous!


I'm surprised your getting that good of mpgs on Florida gas.

Posted by: roydjt Nov 25 2012, 10:41 PM

QUOTE (malawibob @ Nov 17 2012, 05:55 AM) *
On another note I wonder if anyone else is having an accelerator problem? I had 2011 Hybrid Sonata that was flat out dangerous because it sometimes took over 2 seconds to respond to accelerator pressure. Dealer told me that was normal?!? When asked what he could do for me I told him sell it and immediately took a trade to 2013 Elantra. It also has hesitated responding to accelerator pressure when making a sharp turn. I have to turn from a 90 degree driveway onto a 6 lane highway and believe me you do not want a hesitation in response to pushing, (even gently), on the gas pedal. I believe Hyundai has an engineering problem with the fuel flow that makes their cars dangerous!


Is this with an automatic transmission? The delay you are experiencing may be due to the transmission shifting into another gear, which can take a fraction of a second but feel like quite a bit longer. The Elantra's throttle is drive-by-wire (in the MD/UD and newer for sure, I think it is also in the HD), but the response should be pretty much instantaneous. However, the ECU can delay the throttle actuation to allow the transmission to shift into the best gear.

-Roy

Posted by: mcgov51 Sep 23 2013, 07:36 AM

I've said it before . . . with or without a K&N Air Filter and a fresh Mobile-1 oil change
the new 1.8 Elantra will easily achieve 40mpg on the non-stop, level highway at most
posted speeds. No doubt and IMHO the K&N will get you another 1-2mpg more than
what you would have gotten without it . . . according to my tests over the years.

The biggest factor with any of this is the condition and quality of your oil.
Then the efficiency of your spark plugs & wires and air filter.

For years I drove from point A to Point B and got 4 round trips (62 mi. one-way) on a full tank of gas.
Immed. after a fresh oil change I got 5 round trips on a full tank of gas . . . 124 mi. more. This would
last for about 2 wks then mpg would start to slowly decline.

And my claim about the K&N was qualified (to myself) in the same way. It is good for 1-2mpg.

I use Mobile-1 5W/20 in the winter and 5W/30 in the summer and I change it every 5-6K miles
AND never use anything but an OEM Filter . . . never.

Posted by: 13ABLtd Mar 23 2014, 12:13 AM

2013 Limited with Technology Package and automatic transmission. Car has a K&N drop-in air filter, otherwise 100% stock. Mileage is now just over 58,000.

I commute 98 miles one way 5 days a week. The highway speed limit is 75 mph and the secondary road speed limit is 65 mph. I pass through two towns, but no stoplights. I drive approximately 91 miles on the secondary road. I use the cruise control and the ECO mode is on. I use 87 octane with the 10% methanol, which is also oxygenated. Gasoline without methanol is not available where I live or drive. Driving the posted speed limits, I average 36.5 to 37.5mpg. I have achieved 39.5mpg, but that was driving at 55mph on the drive home in the 65 mph zones only. On occasion, I have achieved 38mpg. If I have a lot of wind, my mpg will drop to 33-35.

While I am disappointed that the mpg rating was inflated, I am happy with what I do get. I wish the fuel tank was a little bit bigger. My mpg numbers were determined by dividing miles driven by gallons of gas used. I have every last fuel receipt since I purchased the car, 6/09/2012, with 9 miles on the odometer.

Off Topic:
I have not had a single issue with the car. The OEM tires lasted 48,000 miles ( rotated every 6K ). Had the headliner clip replaced, per the recall.

mcgov51- How are you determining your mileage? Do the 2011 and 2012 Elantra 's have the same 12.8 gal fuel tank as the 2013? Using all 12.8 gallons: your 4 round trips are 496 miles, at 38.75 mpg. The 5 round trips are 620 miles, at 48.44 mpg. I don't doubt the 496; I've done it as well. But......620 miles?

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